Burden of proof: Niger Delta communities learn the ropes of oil spill monitoring

Bodo Oil Spill – November 2008

In 2012 Amnesty International and CEHRD exposed how a massive 2008 spill at Bodo was far larger than Shell's official estimate. © CEHRD

In 2012 Amnesty International and CEHRD exposed how a massive 2008 spill at Bodo was far larger than Shell’s official estimate. © CEHRD

Shell workers clearing earth from around broken pipeline, Bodo, Nigeria, 7 November 2008.
This still image taken from the film shot by local NGO, Centre for Environment, Human Rights and Development (CEHRD).

On 28 August 2008 a fault in the Trans-Niger pipeline resulted in a significant oil spill into Bodo Creek in Ogoniland. The oil poured into the swamp and creek for weeks, covering the area in a thick slick of oil and killing the fish that people depend on for food and for their livelihood.

Thousands of barrels of oil spouted out of the broken pipeline for 10 weeks before Shell finally clamped it on 7 November 2008.

According to Shell, a total of 1,640 barrels of oil were spilled during the first spill. An independent assessment suggests that some 4,000 barrels poured out every day.

This still was taken from Asset ID: 119486

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